Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Milestones

Milestones are pretty amazing things.  They're like this pre-programmed set of expectations that come with the baby/child handbooks, or, more accurately, with the baby/child itself; a pre-determined minefield of emotional highs and lows for parents.  We know what the milestones are supposed to be, when they're supposed to happen, and in what order.  We hold our collective breaths, and we (insert deep inhale here)...wait...and wait...and wait...  And when they don't happen, we question ourselves, our methodology, our children.  We feel frustration (insert carefully-modulated, controlled exhale here). 

For the parents of children with special needs, there's a love/hate relationship with milestones.  On the one hand, we have to learn how to throw some of them out the window completely, or to push the timelines back to a seemingly impossible place and time.  We learn acceptance in a huge way, while trying to avoid complacence.  On the other hand, we know how to celebrate when milestones are hit, and celebrate BIG!  We curb our expectations, but nothing is ever taken for granted - the simplest of milestones met is usually a monumental accomplishment for our children.

I truly thought this particular milestone would never happen.  Let's just say I think the Kudos t-shirt Samantha's wearing in the last photo is highly-appropriate and well-deserved.  I just wish the photos could show how quickly she does this!

The next great milestone, I think, will be losing the training wheels on her bike.  I won't hold my breath for that one.  Come to think of it, I may have said that at some point about walking, running, dressing herself, using the toilet, reading, writing, tying her shoes...

All in good time...












5 comments:

Lisa Julia Photography said...

Love this! The smile at the end, says it all. Go Sammi!!!!!!!!!

CMSavage6 said...

You go girl! What an accomplishment.

Frau JoLou said...

Yes!!! Great!!

Anonymous said...

Grade 2 music for flutes contains trilling, but trumpet music of the same level does not. Different people have different milestones at different times, just as musicians who play different instruments may have parts with vastly varying difficulties. String musicians do not need to learn how to breathe while wind players and vocalists do. i am an autistic flutist and I will reach milestones, musical or not, on my own time.

charity said...

yay way to go